CS4458 Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2018

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Alternative URL: http://tinyurl.com/CS4458-2018

Contents

Lecturer & TA

  • Lecturer: Dr. Gabriela Avram
  • TA: Kim O'Shea

Timetable

Lecture

  • 9-11 am on Tuesdays in CSG025


Tutorial/Lab

  • 10am-12 pm on Wednesdays in CS305a

Assessment

  • Midterm exam, from the material presented in class and recommended readings- 40%
  • Individual class presentation on selected topic - 25%
  • Group project- selection and evaluation of collaborative tools - 35%

Mark to grade translation table

               30% D2          56% B3
               35% D1          60% B2
               40% C3          64% B1
               48% C2          72% A2
               52% C1          80% A1


CS4558 Computer Supported Cooperative Work

Aim

This course will introduce students to the CSCW and groupware field. It will cover basic concepts in the field and include an examination of software systems designed to support cooperative work - their design, use and evaluation. Issues such as peripheral awareness, ownership of information, common information spaces, media spaces, group support systems, coordination mechanisms and contextual factors in the workplace will be studied. Students will use some groupware technologies, and do a project in the course.

Syllabus

  • Understanding Cooperative Work as a form of work: Communication, collaboration and cooperation at work.
  • Computer support for cooperative work: Groupware systems. The role of technology in supporting /disrupting cooperative work. Strengths and Weaknesses of Audio and Video enhanced systems.
  • The role of the social sciences in CSCW. Field Studies. Ethnographic studies of work.
  • Collaborative Software Systems; Commercial systems - design goals and experiences of their use. Synchronous and asynchronous systems.
  • The problems of evaluation. Methods for evaluation. Issues of organizational context.
  • Hands-on experience with specific groupware systems. Group evaluation.
  • Key unresolved issues in the field, based on current debates and future directions.
  • Incorporating insights from social sciences into system design;
  • Relation of CSCW to Scandinavian tradition of systems development - cooperative design.

Lectures

Labs

Tools to be tested

31 Jan 2018

  • Workshop: Public Consultation

7 Feb 2018

14 Feb 2018 K

  • Lab 2 sheet
  • Discussing Google Docs, Sheets, Slides and wikis as tools for collaboration
  • Collaborative curation resources - Pinterest; bookmarks: Diigo)
  • Facebook Groups and Facebook Pages
Our Own Companies

21 Feb 2018

  • Project Management tools: Asana, Trello


  • Paper presentations
    • Chloe Higgins - Leslie S. Liu, Kori M. Inkpen, and Wanda Pratt. 2015. "I'm Not Like My Friends": Understanding How Children with a Chronic Illness Use Technology to Maintain Normalcy. In Proceedings of the 18th ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work & Social Computing (CSCW '15). ACM, New York, NY, USA, 1527-1539. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1145/2675133.2675201
    • Ryan O'Flynn- Steven Houben, Mads Frost, and Jakob E. Bardram. 2015. Collaborative Affordances of Hybrid Patient Record Technologies in Medical Work. In Proceedings of the 18th ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work & Social Computing (CSCW '15). ACM, New York, NY, USA, 785-797. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1145/2675133.2675164
    • Colin Finnegan - Claus Bossen and Erik Grönvall. 2015. Collaboration in-between: The Care Hotel and Designing for Flexible Use. In Proceedings of the 18th ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work & Social Computing (CSCW '15). ACM, New York, NY, USA, 1289-1301. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1145/2675133.2675243

27 Feb 2018

  • Paper presentations
    • John Ryan - Alexandra Olteanu, Sarah Vieweg, and Carlos Castillo. 2015. What to Expect When the Unexpected Happens: Social Media Communications Across Crises. In Proceedings of the 18th ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work & Social Computing (CSCW '15). ACM, New York, NY, USA, 994-1009. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1145/2675133.2675242
    • Niamh McInerney -Martin Dittus, Giovanni Quattrone, and Licia Capra. 2017. Mass Participation During Emergency Response: Event-centric Crowdsourcing in Humanitarian Mapping. In Proceedings of the 2017 ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work and Social Computing (CSCW '17). ACM, New York, NY, USA, 1290-1303. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1145/2998181.2998216
    • Stephen Callanan- Alexander Thayer, Matthew J. Bietz, Katie Derthick, and Charlotte P. Lee. 2012. I love you, let's share calendars: calendar sharing as relationship work. In Proceedings of the ACM 2012 conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW '12). ACM, New York, NY, USA, 749-758. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1145/2145204.2145317

28 Feb 2018 K

  • Videoconferencing: Skype, Zoom, Appear.in
  • Video and photo sharing; broadcasting
  • Tools used in interviews, data analysis, writing up
  • Group project work

7 Mar 2018

  • Slack
  • Loomio
  • Telegram
  • Workflow tools
    • Kate Torpey - Edith Law, Krzysztof Z. Gajos, Andrea Wiggins, Mary L. Gray, and Alex Williams. 2017. Crowdsourcing as a Tool for Research: Implications of Uncertainty. In Proceedings of the 2017 ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work and Social Computing (CSCW '17). ACM, New York, NY, USA, 1544-1561. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1145/2998181.2998197
    • David Williams- Kou, Y., Kow, Y.M., Gui, X. et al. Comput Supported Coop Work (2017)One Social Movement, Two Social Media Sites: A Comparative Study of Public Discourses. 26: 807. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10606-017-9284-y
    • Sean Aherne- Xiaojuan Ma, Li Yu, Jodi L. Forlizzi, and Steven P. Dow. 2015. Exiting the Design Studio: Leveraging Online Participants for Early-Stage Design Feedback. In Proceedings of the 18th ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work & Social Computing (CSCW '15). ACM, New York, NY, USA, 676-685. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1145/2675133.2675174

14 Mar 2018


    • Aaron Griffin - Amy Voida, Zheng Yao, and Matthias Korn. 2015. (Infra)structures of Volunteering. In Proceedings of the 18th ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work & Social Computing (CSCW '15). ACM, New York, NY, USA, 1704-1716. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1145/2675133.2675153
    • Conor Casey - Jennifer Marlow, Scott Carter, Nathaniel Good, and Jung-Wei Chen. 2016. Beyond Talking Heads: Multimedia Artifact Creation, Use, and Sharing in Distributed Meetings. In Proceedings of the 19th ACM Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work & Social Computing (CSCW '16). ACM, New York, NY, USA, 1703-1715. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1145/2818048.2819958
    • Carolyn O'Donoghue - Mara Balestrini, Paul Marshall, Raymundo Cornejo, Monica Tentori, Jon Bird, and Yvonne Rogers. 2016. Jokebox: Coordinating Shared Encounters in Public Spaces. In Proceedings of the 19th ACM Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work & Social Computing (CSCW '16). ACM, New York, NY, USA, 38-49. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1145/2818048.2835203

21 Mar 2016

  • midterm exam

28 Mar 2018

  • Easter Holiday

4 Apr 2018

    • Paula Cusack - Jeni Paay, Jesper Kjeldskov, and Mikael B. Skov. 2015. Connecting in the Kitchen: An Empirical Study of Physical Interactions while Cooking Together at Home. In Proceedings of the 18th ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work & Social Computing (CSCW '15). ACM, New York, NY, USA, 276-287. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1145/2675133.2675194
    • Lee Brogan - Melissa Mazmanian and Simone Lanette. 2017. "Okay, One More Episode": An Ethnography of Parenting in the Digital Age. In Proceedings of the 2017 ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work and Social Computing (CSCW '17). ACM, New York, NY, USA, 2273-2286. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1145/2998181.2998218
    • Darragh Lynch - Hyosun Kwon, Boriana Koleva, Holger Schnädelbach, and Steve Benford. 2017. "It's Not Yet A Gift": Understanding Digital Gifting. In Proceedings of the 2017 ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work and Social Computing (CSCW '17). ACM, New York, NY, USA, 2372-2384. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1145/2998181.2998225

11 Apr 2018

  • Understanding the Collaborative Economy; Case Studies
    • draw a card
    • Google the name; check its website, the Wikipedia article(if there is one), and any social media and news content that you can find on the topic.
    • Attempt to answer the following questions:
      • Who are the users? Who is selling and who is buying? How is the platform calling them?
      • What is being shared?
      • Is this actually real "sharing"? Or is it a commercial service facilitated by a digital platform?
      • Who is making a profit?

Paper Presentations

    • Rebecca Adler * Sarah Evans, Katie Davis, Abigail Evans, Julie Ann Campbell, David P. Randall, Kodlee Yin, and Cecilia Aragon. 2017. More Than Peer Production: Fanfiction Communities as Sites of Distributed Mentoring. In Proceedings of the 2017 ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work and Social Computing (CSCW '17). ACM, New York, NY, USA, 259-272. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1145/2998181.2998342
    • Bryan McCarthy * John M. Carroll and Victoria Bellotti. 2015. Creating Value Together: The Emerging Design Space of Peer-to-Peer Currency and Exchange. In Proceedings of the 18th ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work & Social Computing (CSCW '15). ACM, New York, NY, USA, 1500-1510. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1145/2675133.2675270
    • Patryk Lewandowski * Michael A. DeVito, Jeremy Birnholtz, and Jeffery T. Hancock. 2017. Platforms, People, and Perception: Using Affordances to Understand Self-Presentation on Social Media. In Proceedings of the 2017 ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work and Social Computing (CSCW '17). ACM, New York, NY, USA, 740-754. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1145/2998181.2998192

18 Apr 2018

  • Group Presentations

Individual assignments - presentations during the lab

  • Each of you will be assigned a paper to read and present in class.

You will get 10 minutes for the presentation and 5 minutes for discussion. Your presentation should include:

  • The paper title, authors, publication year and venue (conference or journal)
  • Your name, student number, and the date of your presentation
  • An outline of your presentation - 1 slide
  • Introduction: what was your paper about - 1 slide
  • Context, main concepts, definitions - 1 slide
  • Methodology - 1 slide
  • Main points in the paper - a summary - max 3 slides
  • Your conclusions - what are you taking away ? - 1 slide

On the day of your presentation, you will have to upload your slides to Sulis in order to be graded.

Papers for the midterm exam

Tools for the midterm exam

  • Slack or Loomio
  • Trello or Asana
  • Zoom or Appear.in

SUGGESTED TOPICS

  • Systems for emergency preparedness and large-scale rapid deployment (e.g. disaster relief)
  • The Open Source phenomenon as CSCW application
  • Art installations: CSCW and the arts, media, museums, etc.
  • Virtual Enviroments
  • Collaborative Filtering (social bookmarking, social citations, social shopping)
  • Methodologies and tools for design and analysis of collaborative practices
  • Music sharing as a computer supported collaborative application
  • Creating media spaces through collaborative work
  • Social and organizational effects of introducing technologies
  • Computer-Supported Cooperative Music
  • CSCW at home: cooperative work in the family
  • Music sharing as a computer supported collaborative application
  • The concept of awareness in CSCW
  • The dual character of work: the work needed for making work happen
  • Organisational memory and organisational forgetting
  • Computer Supported Cooperative Care/Health
  • Web 2.0, Enterprise 2.0, Mashups
  • Computer-Supported Cooperative Learning in the era of Web 2.0
  • The problems of evaluation. Methods for evaluation. Issues of organizational context.

Course material

  • Baecker, R. (ed.) Readings in Groupware and Computer-Supported Cooperative Work: Assisting Human-Human Collaboration. San Mateo, CA: Morgan Kaufmann.
  • Greif, I. (ed.) 1988 CSCW: A Book of Readings. San Mateo, CA: Morgan Kaufmann.
  • Selected papers from European CSCW (1989-) and ACM CSCW (1986-) Conferences.
  • Selected material from CSCW Journal (Kluwer) (1992-).


Other topics:

Reading a research paper


Individual assignments (25%)

  • In connection with a topic discussed in class, each week a number of 2-3 students will present a paper connected to the topic.
  • All students will have to read the papers selected for the specific topic.
  • The students have 10 minutes for presenting and 5 min for Q&A.
  • The slides will have to be submitted on the day of the presentation via Sulis.
  • There will be 10% for presenting and 15% for the actual content.
  • Grading will be done by both lecturer/TA and class; each participant will submit grades and possibly feedback. The average of the grades given by peers will weigh 50% and the lecturer's the other 50%.

Group assignments (35%)

Assignment briefing

  • the students will form groups of 3-4, choosing a research topic and a combination of communication/collaboration/coordination tools to be used during the remaining weeks of the semester.
  • the group project has as purpose to do research in groups on topics of your choice related to Interaction Design/HCI/Social Impact of Technology/Organisational or Cultural Issues in relation to Technology. I made a couple of suggestions on the wiki (A, B, C…) but you can suggest your own. I would recommend that you choose something you are interested in, and that could possibly feed into your FYP later on. Check with me if you are suggesting your own topic.
  • the students will meet as a group to agree on the topic. After that, you collaborate, coordinate and communicate online about this, using a combination of tools of your choice. I suggest you make the decision regarding tools in the first week or two and that you don’t change, even if the tool proves to be a bad fit for the purpose.
  • First, the group needs to come up with a plan for action. Will it be a literature review on the topic only, maybe illustrated with some case studies from the papers you read? Or would you like to add some user studies, for example design and run a quick survey among your friends and family to check their experiences and attitudes towards, for example, Voice Interfaces? Or maybe you want to go further and design a solution for a problem you identified? A sketch or a paper prototype would be enough. Or maybe you want to write a design fiction case related to that topic. Each group can decide for themselves.
  • Your group presentation on this has to be max 10 min, and produce between 7 and 10 pages of report. The time budget for this is 8-10 hours for each student until the end of the semester, including independent work and group meetings/ work. The plan can change on the way - just choose the topic and get started.
  • Secondly, the group will undertake observation while working on this, and reflect on the role the chosen tools are playing. At the end of each online session, leave 5 min to discuss what worked well and what didn’t. How happy are you with the functionalities of the tools you are using? Identify aspects of:
    • coordination (who does what by when, where will you share your work, and so on)
    • collaboration(let’s say one of you is finding articles on the topic, and then you decide together which ones are really suitable)
    • communication (how do you inform each other about what needs to get done next)
  • It is recommended that you keep a diary on this- individually or as a group. A blog might be an overkill. A shared Google Doc could do the trick, but adding screen captures in that requires several steps. Maybe you keep a Google Doc for the text - with dates and observations, and store screen captures locally or share them in a Google Drive folder. Or you could appoint a person as “the ethnographer”, the one who is in charge with writing down the observations, taking and storing the screen captures. If so, make sure you reduce a bit the amount of tasks s/he gets on the research and design side.
  • the second part of your presentation (max 10 min) and report (5-10pages) will be dedicated to this reflection on tools. There will be a lot of screen shots, so it won’t be difficult to fill the space.
  • During week 13 (16-17 April 2018 ) each group will give a presentation including:
    • the topic researched- literature sources and case studies/design fiction/prototype/user studies
    • a description of the collaborative tools employed, tasks performed, problems encountered
    • sample logs of online communication

The group outcomes- slides+report - will be submitted via Sulis as PDF documents no later than 27 April, 5pm. One member of the group will make the submission on behalf of the group, and the names of the group members will have to be on both the slides and the report.

  • For each application, you will have to:
    • try it out with your colleagues in the context of your joint research- check its functionalities and figure out how to use it and for what purposes.
    • describe and illustrate 1-2 episodes from your own experience with using that specific tool/application.

The topics for the group assignment

  • For each topic, you will have to
    • draw a profile of your users
    • develop a scenario of collaboration

Groups and topics for the assignment

  • Group 1 - Bryan McCarthy, Carolyn O'Donoghue, Rebecca Adler, - C. Social Innovation - Peer to Peer Service for Solving a Community Issue: Elderly Loneliness and University Accommodation
  • Group 2 - Paula Cusack, Chloe Higgins, Niamh McInerney, Patryk Lewandowski - Wearables and Healthcare
  • Group 3 - Kate Torpey, Stephen Callanan, Conor Casey - Validation of Human Centered Design
  • Group 4 - Darragh Lynch, David Williams, John Ryan - D. VR / AR Wearables and Coordination
  • Group 5 - Ryan O'Flynn, Colin Finnegan, Sean Ahearne - Voice User Interfaces in Collaboration

Add names and topics next to each group. Use A, B, C for identifying the topics.

A. Team SelfCare
B. Music Production, Distribution and Consumption
C. Social Innovation- Peer to Peer Service for Solving a Community Issue
D. Wearables and Coordination
E. Cultural Heritage Site
F. Serious Games- Sustainability&Resilience
G. Voice User Interfaces in Collaboration
H. Time Management in Distributed Team Work

Group presentation schedule

Tuesday 17- Wed 18 April 2018

-

Outline for the class presentation

  • title page - topic chosen, group number/name, group members
  • outline of the presentation
  • the chosen topic -3-4 slides (literature review & intervention)
  • collaboration, communication and coordination tools you chose (1-2 slides per tool), pros and cons
  • examples of situations that occurred - both war and success stories
  • reflection (see below)
  • conclusion

Outline for the final group report

  • Title page - Pick up a name for your project and add the names of the authors, date and module
  • Table of content
  • Introduction - the chosen topic for research, collaborative work in general, what tools you picked up and what was the role of each of them - even if they are not presented in detail later. If you used mobile phones to coordinate, mention it.
  • Present the preliminary research undertaken, the data collected and the findings.
  • Present each of the tools you used; whenever possible, cite CSCW literature on that tool and explain the main functionalities.
  • Discussion/reflection:
    • What worked well in your collaboration and what could be improved?
    • What part of the work was done working apart, and what part working together in the same room?
    • Would it have worked out without meeting in person at all?
    • Were you ever frustrated because of the technology?
    • If you'd start again, would you pick up a different tool? What would you do different?
  • Conclusion: what do you think were the most important 3 things you have learned from this collaboration.
  • References
  • Max 20 pages in total, with screen captures and everything (excluding title page, TOC, references and appendices).
  • If you wrote a blog, or have chat logs, you can attach them as appendices.

Milestones

  • February - groups defined
  • March - each group decides on the brief, the collaboration tools they want to use, create accounts and decide on weekly online meetings
  • 17 Apr 2018 - presentations
  • 27 Apr 2018 5pm - group report and slides submitted via Sulis

Assessment

  • presentation 15%
  • group report 20%
  • all group members will receive the same mark

Schedule of Presentations

  • Tuesday, 17 April 2017
  • Venue: The Design Studio- CS2045
    • 9-9:30 - Group 5 - (Ryan O'Flynn, Colin Finnegan, Sean Ahearne - Voice User Interfaces in Collaboration)
    • 9:30-10 - Group 2 - (Paula Cusack, Chloe Higgins, Niamh McInerney, Patryk Lewandowski) - Wearables and Healthcare
    • 10:00-10:30 - Group 1 (Carolyn O'Donoghue,Bryan McCarthy,Rebecca Adler)- Social Innovation
    • 10:30-11:00 - Group 3 (Kate Torpey, Conor Casey, Stephen Callanan) - Validation of Human Centered Design
    • 11:00-11:30 - Group 4 (Darragh Lynch, John Ryan, David Williams - Wearables and Coordination)
    • 11:30-11:45 - Lee Brogan
    • 11:45-12:00 - Aaron Griffin

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